Uncoupling of analgesia, tolerance, and euphoria from mu-agonists using buprenorphine

I presented this topic at the Atlanta meeting of ASAM a couple weeks ago.  There are too many slides, but the historical stuff was just too fascinating to leave out.  I wanted to demonstrate,  by lining it up on the side, how time has compressed the most critical discoveries to a very short period of time.  In other words, it wasn’t until thousands of years of opium use that the general concept of endorphines and opioid receptors came along.  We can only hope that similar understandings of the biological basis of tolerance and withdrawal will be comparatively soon.
My study shows something truly fascinating– that a partial agonist seems to anchor tolerance at a lower level, still allowing for potent analgesia, but preventing euphoria and dose escalation.  I have used this combination in people with very major surgeries, that are known to be quite painful– i.e. knee and hip replacements, dental surgeries, gallbladder surgery, and median sternotomy.

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